Acahualla

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Acahualla is a largely tropical district in Sargon.

Background

A full map of the Acahuallan jungle, including its coastlines along the inland sea.

Located to the east of the Sargonian dunes and separated by a large, wide canyon, the dense tropical jungles of Acahualla is inhabited by Archosaurians, Liberi and Pythia who, regardless of races, prefer to use "Tiacauh"[note 1] when referring to themselves. Due to their isolationism from the outside world as well as Sargon's expansionism and absorption of other regions, the inhabitants possess a distinct culture from the desert clans in mainland Sargon and a primitive lifestyle far from the marvels of the Terran civilization. They believe in the philosophy of "might makes right" in which, humorously, includes whether an Archosauria's tail should be thick or thin.[1]

Despite being part of Sargon, it appears that Acahualla is only nominally part of it, and is in fact de facto its own separate geographical and cultural entity, which Sargon has staked an arbitrary claim over. The Sargonian lords did, however, attempted to put de jure administration onto the region but eventually ended in failure. Centuries ago, Acahualla was home to a thriving Sargonian mining colony centered in a nomadic city. However, a Catastrophe forced the nomadic city to leave and caused the iron mines to be overrun with Originium. Some of the colonists were left behind while others later returned to Acahualla and settled in the jungle who later became the ancestors of the Acahuallans. Ten years ago, the Sargonian lords considered relocating some of their current-generation nomadic cities into Acahualla to reactivate the iron mines. Sadly, they were forced to abandon the plan after the initial survey results suggesting that the area does not have much economic and strategic value.[2] Due to its insignificance, the Sargonian Padishahs and Lords Ameer have been ignoring Acahualla for years, and there is even no official military stationed there, making the region relatively self-autonomous.[3]

The Acahuallans are divided into various tribes, with the following as the most notable:

  • Gavial's Tribe.png
    Gavial's Will: A confederation of several Acahuallan tribes where Gavial and Tomimi are born into. Originally called Wilderness Will, the tribe was later renamed by the current chieftain Tomimi in order to honor her friend Gavial.[3]
  • Eunectes Tribe.png
    Eunectes: Led by Zumama as the chieftain, the Eunectes tribe is the largest of all the Acahuallan tribes. The tribe absorbed other smaller tribes and settles near the iron mines, giving it a monopoly over most of the iron deposits. It is also known for their interest in technology, particularly machinery, thanks to Zumama's techno-maniac attitude.
  • Flint Tribe.png
    Flint: The tribe where Kemar belongs to. It comprises of many Liberi Tiacauhs who settle in the deeper parts of the Acahuallan jungles. Recently, they begin making territory grabs from other tribes.
  • Inam's Tribe.png
    Inam Committee: Led by Inam as the chieftain, the Inam Committee is one of the Acahuallan tribes that actively engages in commerce activities with the outside world instead of fighting other tribes.

Despite the division and inner conflicts, the Acahuallans are united under the helm of a Great Chief traditionally elected from tribal representatives in the "Mahuizzotia"[note 2] ceremony. Originated from a Tiacauh Brave who wished to give himself a title, it is held in an ancient temple in the middle of Acahualla and is organized in a tournament-like form.[4] Although the ceremony seems to be a "duel," the representatives are allowed to bring reinforcements and even use any weapons they wish in the match, making it more of a brawl.

During the Zeruertza incident in which a mass population of Durins needed to flee from an encroaching giant Originium vein underground, the Acahuallans warmly welcomed the refugees. However, it could post a potential political threat as Acahualla might be invaded by other Padishahs due to the sudden presence of the Durins. Fortunately, Inam became the nominal Lord Ameer of the district and settled the issue with the royal court peacefully. Even other Padishahs have no interest on Achualla in reality thanks to the locals' covering up of the incident.[5] As a matter of fact, the district is currently undergoing an unimaginable development for the first time as the local Durins introduce their latest technologies to the Acahuallans.

However, things wouldn't go as expected, as both Durins and Ticauh cut ties with each other after a discussion about liquor taste and industrial design, which led to a liquor cannon battle that damaged the bridge connecting the rainforest and the desert, only for a storm to finally break it down. Luckily, after Angelina managed to help resolving their problems, both factions left their differences aside and rebuilt not only the bridge, but also their friendship.[6]

Notable inhabitants


  • Eliza
  • Juan: One of the former Great Chiefs of Acahualla with the longest reign. He died after being chased off a cliff by his wife following a drunken stupor, forcing the Acahuallan tribes to perform the troublesome Mahuizzotia ceremony involving Gavial and Eunectes to elect his successor.[1]
  • Peta: An Archosaurian champion of the Gavial's Will tribe who was attacked by Ceobe after winning a match in the present-day Mahuizzotia festival.[7] He later appeared when Tomimi tried to stop Gavial from leaving Acahualla and attempted to take Dylan and Lancet-2 hostage.[8]
  • Yogi: An Archosaurian tribesman of the Eunectes tribe who contracted Oripathy after going into the deeper parts of the Originium mine.[9] He works as the Yota tribe's Deputy chief.[6]
  • Yota: The brother of Yogi and chieftain of the namesake tribe.

Enemies

Normal
Elite

Gallery

Landmarks

People

Etymology

Acahualla means "(the) land overgrown with weeds" in Nahuatl.[10]

Notes

  1. "One (who are) valiant in war" (i.e. "Warrior") in Nahuatl
  2. "Bestowing honor and glory" in Nahuatl

References